Nissans zeroemissions ice cream truck gets rid of the ICE

first_img4:38 Concept Cars Electric Cars Vans More From Roadshow Now playing: Watch this: 2019 Nissan Pathfinder Rock Creek Edition first drive: Its roots are showing More about 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus review: A better EV, but maybe not the best Review • 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus review: A better EV, but maybe not the best Nissan built an ice cream truck that’s efficient from start to finish News • 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus officially achieves 226-mile range, but there’s a catch Preview • 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus first drive: Expanding the EV’s appeal Nissan Tags Share your voice 2020 Nissan Versa first drive: 15% more price, 100% more car 1 Comment 24 Photos Nissan Leaf long-term wrap-up: One year of electric feels Enlarge ImageShrug off the effects of climate change with a nice ice cream cone, served by a vehicle that’s doing its part to mitigate future effects of climate change. Nissan According to Nissan, there are some monsters out there who have a problem with ice cream trucks — not the idea of an ice cream truck or the thought of children sprinting out into the street, but the overall ecological footprint of such an endeavor. Thankfully, Nissan engineered a way around that, and it’s green from “sky to scoop,” as the automaker puts it.Nissan on Thursday unveiled its vision for a zero-emissions ice cream truck. And it’s not just the truck that is better for the environment — it’s the entire process in and around the idea of serving ice cream from a vehicle.The vehicle itself is a modified version of Nissan’s e-NV200 small van, which replaces the internal combustion engine (ICE) with a battery-electric powertrain. According to the automaker, some ice cream trucks get a bad rap because they have diesel engines that must remaining running to power the refrigeration system, which can lead to a whole bunch of gnarly emissions.But the e-NV200 doesn’t actually use the EV battery for keeping that ice cream cold. Instead, it uses Nissan’s Energy Roam system, which uses recycled Nissan EV batteries as a portable power pack that can deliver energy where it’s needed. Hell, even the ice cream itself is zero-emissions (minus, you know, the cow flatulence), because the creamery that makes the product — Mackie’s of Scotland — powers its farm with wind and solar energy.Even the experience of serving the ice cream is delightfully different. There’s no room to hang out in the back of the van, so the driver stands outside and serves ice cream directly to customers in a more personal manner. There’s a contactless payment terminal right on the side of the van. Instead of rolling around playing tunes, the van generates a What3Words code for its location, narrowing down its parking spot to a 3-meter-by-3-meter square. That way, kids don’t hear the music and immediately start shaking parents down for spare change, and there’s no worry about missing it.It’s just a concept, of course, so don’t expect this ice cream truck to show up in your neighborhood this summer. But nevertheless, it’s yet another unique approach to figuring out how zero-emissions tech can green up the auto industry beyond regular ol’ passenger cars. Green tech Nissanlast_img read more

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooters Brain

first_img Share Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDSU.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter’s brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound.Military personnel may be endangering their own brains when they operate certain shoulder-fired weapons, according to an Army-commissioned report released Monday.The report, from the Center for a New American Security, says these bazooka-like weapons pose a hazard because they are powered by an explosion just inches from the operator’s head.“When you fire it, the pressure wave feels like getting hit in the face,” says Paul Scharre, a former Army Ranger who directs the technology and national security program at the center. Scharre is a co-author of the center’s report: Protecting Warfighters from Blast Injury.The report looks at a range of injuries caused by blast waves — pulses of high pressure air that emanate from an explosion and travel faster than the speed of sound.During the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, military officials recognized that the blast wave from a roadside bomb could damage a person’s brain without leaving any visible sign of injury. And in 2010, the Pentagon issued a memo outlining steps to improve care of troops exposed to these explosions.Since then, there’s been growing evidence that blasts from weapons like the Carl Gustav recoilless rifle and the AT4 anti-tank weapon can also affect the brain.Cpl. Devon Tindle/III Marine Expeditionary Force/DVIDSSgt. John Wagley fires an AT4 anti-tank missile during a training session at Camp Fuji in Japan. Studies find that some who fire these weapons repeatedly have short-term problems with memory and thinking. It’s still not clear, scientists say, whether those temporary changes can lead to permanent deficits.“If you’re looking at a large anti-tank rocket that a soldier would carry on his or her shoulder, that’s now a pretty large explosion — and it’s happening right next to your head,” Scharre says.Studies show that some service members who fire these weapons repeatedly have short-term problems with memory and thinking. What’s not clear is whether those temporary changes can lead to permanent deficits.“If you’re exposed to these weapons throughout the course of your military career, this might have some subtle and insidious long-term effect that doesn’t materialize until later,” Scharre says.The military is studying that possibility, and the new report is a part of that effort. But a definitive answer about the risks from firing weapons is probably many years off.The report says the military should make changes now, despite the uncertainty.One recommendation is much wider use of devices known as blast gauges, which measure the intensity of blast waves. The gauges are typically about the size of a wristwatch and service members attach them to their shoulders and helmet.“Every service member who is in a position where he or she might be exposed to blast waves should be wearing these devices,” Scharre says. “And we need to be recording that data, putting it in their record and then putting it in a database for medical studies.”Authors of the report also recommend steps to reduce service members’ exposure to blast waves during training exercises. For example, they say, the military should reduce the maximum number of times a person can fire certain weapons in a single day, and over several days.The military should also look into a new type of helmet that’s designed to protect the brain from blast waves, the report says.The findings of the analysis are no surprise to Kyle Sims, a former Special Forces medic who helped deploy blast gauges in Afghanistan.Sims realized something disturbing when he started looking into research on brain damage among football players who’d taken repeated blows to the head.“It’s not that one time that the guy got knocked unconscious,” Sims says. “It’s the 500 times that the guy got hit prior to that.”Sims is especially worried about service members involved in training others to fire heavy weapons. These people often spend entire days on a range where the weapons are being fired.One retired officer told Sims about a day of training when he’d been exposed to more than 100 blasts from anti-tank weapons.“When he got done talking, I said, ‘Well, don’t tell me — let me guess. At the end of the day you felt nauseous, you had a headache, you felt tired [and] all you wanted to do was take a Motrin, lay down and go to bed.’ He’s like, ‘Yeah.’ And I was like, ‘Well, that’s typical post-concussive symptoms there, buddy.’ “The military should start treating personnel exposed to blast waves the way it treats people who work around hazardous radiation, Sims says. In other words, set a limit to how much blast exposure a person can receive during their military career.“If there was a hazard in the civilian world for workers to be exposed to blast overpressure, we would have had a standard in place decades ago,” he says.An Army spokesperson tells NPR the military is reviewing the report and will offer a response and recommendations.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

15yearold boy found murdered in vacant plot

first_imgA 15-year-old boy was found murdered in a vacant plot of land in North-east Delhi’s Harsh Vihar area on Monday evening.According to the police, the deceased boy has been identified as Raza. The incident came to light on Sunday evening when he went missing after he went to walk outside his house after dinner in the I block of the Sunder Nagri colony. His family started searching for him frantically and informed the nearby police station. On Monday at around 4.30pm, a relative spotted Raza’s body in a vacant plot of land near the Jail Road and informed his parents. Also Read – Man arrested for making hoax call at IGI airportRaza’s father, Bhura, is a wholesale fruit seller. Raza is survived by his parents and four brothers and three sisters and was the eldest amongst them. Raza used to study in class IV of a local private school. Raza’s father said that he studied in a government school upto class V but was later shifted to the private school near their house. “I wanted my son to study in an English medium school so I shifted Raza to the private school near our house. However, the school authorities denied him admission in class VI because of bad academic background so he was made to start his studies from class I in this school,” said Bhura.He added that Raza’s neck was tied with a rope and his face was completely smashed. After his body was found by their relative, Raza’s family informed the police which took his body to a nearby hospital.last_img read more

After Complaints Apple Drops Price of USBC Dongles

first_img Having to use a dongle to connect peripherals to a new device isn’t awesome. It’s even less awesome when you have to pay for those little connectors.Lots of MacBook Pro users will inevitably deal with this issue as Apple’s new laptop only has USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports. Cupertino has apparently heard all the complaints about this and it’s taking action. Don’t get too excited: the company isn’t going to ship adapters with its new MacBook Pro for free like many have wished, but it is dropping the price of dongles. The Verge reports that all of Apple’s USB-C adapters and some of its USB-C cables are now $6 to $20 cheaper. USB-C charging cables, meanwhile, are not getting a discount.”We recognize that many users, especially pros, rely on legacy connectors to get work done today and they face a transition,” the tech giant said, according to the report. “We want to help them move to the latest technology and peripherals, as well as accelerate the growth of this new ecosystem. Through the end of the year, we are reducing prices on all USB-C and Thunderbolt 3 peripherals we sell, as well as the prices on Apple’s USB-C adapters and cables.”Here’s a list of the new prices, according to The Verge:USB-C to traditional USB adapter — now $9 (previously $19)Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter — now $29 (previously $49)USB-C to Lightning cable (1 meter) — now $19 (previously $25)USB-C to Lightning cable (2 meters) — now $29 (previously $35)Multiport adapter with HDMI, USB, and USB-C — now $49 (previously $69)Multiport adapter with VGA, USB, and USB-C — now $49 (previously $69)Apple is also dropping the price of all third-party USB-C peripherals it sells by about 25 percent. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Free This story originally appeared on PCMag 2 min read November 7, 2016 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowlast_img read more

YouTube disables all comments on videos featuring children in an attempt to

first_imgYouTube has disabled all comments from its videos featuring young children in order to curb the spread of pedophiles who are using YouTube to trade clips of young girls in states of undress. This issue was first discovered, when Matt Watson, a video blogger, posted a 20-minute clip detailing how comments on YouTube were used to identify certain videos in which young girls were in activities that could be construed as sexually suggestive, such as posing in front of a mirror and doing gymnastics. Youtube’s content regulation practices have been in the spotlight in recent years. Last week, YouTube received major criticism for recommending videos of minors and allowing pedophiles to comment on these posts, with a specific time stamp of the video of when an exposed private part of the young child was visible. YouTube was also condemned for monetizing these videos allowing advertisements for major brands like Nestle, Fortnite, Disney, Fiat, Fortnite, L’Oreal, Maybelline, etc to be displayed on these videos. Following this news, a large number of companies have suspended their advertising spending from YouTube and refused to do so until YouTube took strong actions. In the same week, YouTube told Buzzfeed News that it is demonetizing channels that promote anti-vaccination content. YouTube said that this type of content does not align with its policy and called it “dangerous and harmful” content. Actions taken by YouTube YouTube said that it will now disable comments worldwide on almost all videos of minors by default. It said the change would take effect over several months. This will include videos featuring young and older minors that could be at risk of attracting predatory behavior. They are further introducing new comments classifier powered by machine learning that will identify and remove twice as many predatory comments as the old one. YouTube has also banned videos that encourage harmful and dangerous challenges. “We will continue to take actions on creators who cause egregious harm to the community”, they wrote in a blog post. “Nothing is more important to us than ensuring the safety of young people on the platform,” said YouTube chief executive Susan Wojcicki on Twitter. Despite her apologetic comments, she was on the receiving end of a brutal backlash with people asking her to resign from the organization. The internet is slowly becoming a harmful place for young tweens. Not just Youtube, recently, TikTok, the popular video-sharing app which is a rage among tweens, was accused of illegally collecting personal information from children under 13. It was fined $5.7m by the US Federal Trade Commission. TikTok has now implemented features to accommodate younger US users in a limited, separate app experience that has additional safety and privacy protections. Similar steps have, however, not been implemented across their global operations. Read Next Nestle, Disney, Fortnite pull out their YouTube ads from paedophilic videos as YouTube’s content regulation woes continue. Youtube promises to reduce recommendations of ‘conspiracy theory’. Ex-googler explains why this is a ‘historic victory’. Is the YouTube algorithm’s promoting of #AlternativeFacts like Flat Earth having a real-world impact?last_img read more

Airbnb on track to become 4th largest OTA

first_img SAN FRANCISCO – After making strategic moves in recent months that included a new deal in Cuba and a groundbreaking agreement with American Express Global Business Travel (GBT), Airbnb is on track to become the world’s fourth largest online travel company by the end of 2016.As reported by Travel Weekly, the peer-to-peer accommodations service, which doesn’t disclose bookings or revenue figures, is expected to surpass the annual bookings of European juggernaut eDreams Odigeo this year. eDreams Odigeo is comprised of five brands, including OPodo, Travelink and Go Voyages, and generated 10.7 billion euros in bookings for the year ended March 31.According to research firm Phocuswright, Airbnb likely generated approximately US$7.5 billion in gross bookings in 2015. After this year, the company will trail only Expedia Inc., Priceline Group and China-based Ctrip in annual gross bookings.Earlier this summer, Airbnb filed documentation that indicated it will be raising $850 million in funding, which would put the company’s value at approximately $90 billion, reports Bloomberg News. More news:  Flight Centre Travel Group takes full ownership of Quebec-based agencyAlmost one in three U.S. travellers stayed at a home-based unit in 2015, up from one in 10 in 2011, Phocuswright said. Posted by Share Wednesday, August 17, 2016 Airbnb on track to become 4th largest OTA Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more