Caymanas tips

first_imgBELIEVE SHADE OF BEAUTY BELIEVE SHADE OF BEAUTY#ZUGULU ZUGULU A THOUSAND STARS A THOUSAND STARSWESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH VALENTINE BOYGOLD MEMBER GOLD MEMBER GANJA MAN DEMOLITION BOYMISS ADDI STAN ROY #STAN ROY STAN ROYJESSE’S FAVORITE JESSE’S FAVORITE JESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITETHE REAL RHYTHM THE REAL RHYTHM #THE REAL RHYTHM CUTTERPERFECT FLYER #ROLEX ROLEX PERFECT FLYER#REGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLD ANOTHER BULLET #REGALLY BOLDFORCE DE JOUR ITALIANO FORCE DE JOUR FORCE DE JOURALI BABA #PETE’SWILDONE ALI BABA ALI BABACHANGE HIM NAME BELIEVE AWESOME CODE SHADE OF BEAUTYZUGULU #ZUGULU A THOUSAND STARS A THOUSAND STARS#WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITHGANJA MAN GOLD MEMBER GOLD MEMBER GANJA MAN#STAN ROY STAN ROY TRACKING DANIEL STAN ROYJESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITETHE REAL RHYTHM EXPRESS TRUCK THE REAL RHYTHM EXPRESS TRUCKDEVIL’S CHILD ROLEX FASTANDFLASHY ROLEXREGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLD #REGALLY BOLD #ANOTHER BULLETFORCE DE JOUR FORCE DE JOUR FORCE DE JOUR FORCE DE JOURALI BABA FRANFIELD ALI BABA ALI BABACLASSICAL TRAIN BELIEVE #CLASSICAL TRAIN BELIEVE#LIKE A LADY ZUGULU ZUGULU LIKE A LADYWESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITH WESTERN FAITHCRUCIAL VALOR GOLD MEMBER GOLD MEMBER GANJA MANSTAN ROY MISS ADDI STAN ROY WHO’S BOSSY#JESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITE DOOLAHINEXPRESS TRUCK THE REAL RHYTHM THE REAL RHYTHM CUTTERGRANDE MARQUE PERFECT FLYER ROLEX ROLEXREGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLDBORDER LINE BORDER LINE FORCE DE JOUR #BORDER LINEALI BABA #PETE’SWILDONE TRADITIONAL PRINCE #PETE’SWILDONESHADE OF BEAUTY SHADE OF BEAUTYZUGULU ZUGULUWESTERN FAITH #DAINTY DOTTIEGOLD MEMBER GANJA MANSTAN ROY STAN ROYJESSE’S FAVORITE #JESSE’S FAVORITE#CUTTER THE REAL RHYTHM#FASTANDFLASHY PERFECT FLYERREGALLY BOLD REGALLY BOLDFORCE DE JOUR FORCE DE JOURALI BABA PETE’SWILDONElast_img read more

People with disabilities unfairly prevented from Transport Supports for 5 years – Doherty TD

first_imgSinn Féin Finance Spokesperson Deputy Pearse Doherty has today heavily criticised the Government over its ongoing failure to replace both the Motorised Transport Grant and Mobility Allowance Schemes.The grants, which were previously paid to people with disabilities in order to help them meet their transport and mobility needs, were closed to new applicants back in 2013 with payments made to existing recipients of the latter to continue pending the establishment of a new dedicated Transport Support Scheme.However, despite repeated government pledges to replace the schemes it has now been revealed that a memorandum, which was to be brought to government on proposals to introduce a replacement scheme, was subsequently withdrawn from the agenda of last month’s cabinet meeting, placing its future in doubt. Deputy Doherty said: “Both the Mobility Allowance and Motorised Transport Grant were scrapped back in February 2013 as part of the government’s austerity policies during the financial crash.“This meant that these schemes, which were originally set up to assist people commute to work, gain employment or to simply get around were no longer available to new applicants.“And despite repeated calls on the Government from Sinn Féin TDs to establish a long awaited replacement scheme, here we are over five years on and no such new payments scheme has yet been introduced.“And so while legacy recipients of the Mobility Allowance Grant have continued to receive payments from the HSE, on an interim basis pending the establishment of a new Transport Support Scheme, countless others have been unfairly prevented from accessing supports to enable them to meet their mobility needs. “Now, following correspondence from the Minister for Health in reply to a Parliamentary Question which I tabled earlier this month to query when we can expect such a new scheme to be introduced, it’s now been revealed that a Memorandum to Government on proposals for a new Transport Support Payment Scheme was withdrawn from last month’s cabinet agenda.“Instead, the official line from Government is that revised proposals on the new scheme will be brought to Cabinet in due course.“This is a shocking revelation and is yet further illustrates a complete dereliction by Government of its duties and responsibilities in respect of persons with disabilities.“People with disabilities and those unable to walk are at a heightened risk of exclusion from the workforce and social isolation yet. After more than five years, the Government continues to peddle the same spin that it is working on introducing a suitable replacement scheme despite no evidence of any progress – this is simply not good enough.”People with disabilities unfairly prevented from Transport Supports for 5 years – Doherty TD was last modified: June 19th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DisabilitiesMobility Allowance Schemes.Motorised Transport GrantPearse Doherty TDTransport Support Payment Schemelast_img read more

Rebuilding the Cadillac Brand

first_imgThe Cadillac Shield, a key component of the brand’s resurgence. Source: CadillacThe Cadillac Renaissance: How Cadillac Has Rebuilt Their BrandAs GM neared bankruptcy, all of their brands were put under review to determine which would survive. At the time, GM had already eliminated the Oldsmobile and were taking a look at Pontiac, Hummer, Saab, Buick, and even Cadillac. Cadillac had floundered for many years. The average age of their buyer was over 60, and their cars were largely duds or livery (DTS) vehicles. While they had gained some traction with the Escalade they had failed across the board to create a cohesive product strategy. The cars were uninspiring, the dealerships were tired looking, and the customer experience was underwhelming. The situation looked pretty bad.So How Do You Repair A Damaged Brand?1) Improve the ProductCadillac knew they did not have a cohesive product strategy. Over the course of the 1990s they had tried to be competitive, and had a knack for producing front-wheel-drive cars that catered to their aged customer set. By 2008 they released the ground-breaking Cadillac CTS with their new Art and Science design language. They worked with Modernista! to launch the car with a series of catchy ads with Kate Walsh delivering the now famous line “When you turn your car on, does it return the favor?” The campaign was a hit. It was brash, edgy, and loud — just like the car. The car itself was well received by the Press and won Motor Trend’s Car of the Year. Cadillac attempted to continue this theme with their Escalade and SRX SUVs, but with mixed results. The larger problem was with their customer segments. While the CTS attracted a younger demographic to their brand, some were looking for a smaller car. The CTS attempted to compete in two segments — entry-level Luxury like the 3 Series and the mid-level 5 Series — but it wasn’t small enough for some buyers. In response, Cadillac has released the smaller ATS earlier this year and the larger XTS to compete within all of their segments.2) Modernize the DealershipsIf you walk into an Audi, Mercedes, or Lexus dealership they tend to be new facilities with all the amenities (free drinks, snacks, loaner cars) one would expect from a luxury nameplate. However, if you walk into some Cadillac dealerships, it will look like the last update was 30+ years ago. I recall walking into one in 2010 and noticing they were grilling hot dogs and offering them to their customers. The facility itself looked old — straight out of the 1970s. Cadillac knew they had a problem and rolled out a new dealership design that raised the bar to competitive standards. I went to one of their newer dealerships a few weeks ago, and it was very impressive. Even though the dealership was smaller than their competitors, there was a certain class and sophistication to the design that some of their larger counterparts don’t have.3) Build a Standard-Setting Customer ExperienceIf you’ve read anything about GM you’ve heard the horror stories of unreliable cars, apathetic (at best) dealerships, and very angry customers who vow never to buy another GM car again. That held true to a degree for Cadillac. One important element of rebuilding a tarnished brand is setting a standard above the competition. In order to win back the trust of the customer, you have to demonstrate you are actually better. It’s a formula Hyundai used to great success with their “10 year” warranties. Cadillac has rolled out the “Cadillac” shield to convey their value proposition to their prospects. They offer a longer powertrain warranty, “free” scheduled maintenance (similar to BMW), and six-years-worth of free roadside assistance with free loaner cars. They’ve also improved their sales training. When I visited that newer dealership I brought my mother with me. The salesperson greeted both of us at the door, asked me a few questions about my buying intentions, and realized right away I was a lead to “nurture.” Instead of trying to hard sell me, he took me around the dealership, talked about the car I was interested in, introduced me to a few managers, and let me know they are a family-owned dealership and take care of their employees. After leaving the dealership, I received two emails, from one him and another from his manager offering to answer any questions I might have on the car, the brand, or the dealership. Pretty impressive, and I’ll definitely be back to take a look.What are some other successful rebranding examples you can share? AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Chimpanzee personhood effort begins new court battle

first_img“It went as well as we could have hoped,” says NhRP’s executive director, Natalie Prosin, who was also at the hearing. “The judges were really engaged. They had obviously read our briefs and materials, and they asked really intelligent questions.”Prosin is also heartened by a move the court made in July. In response to NhRP’s concerns that Tommy’s owners would try to move him out of state to avoid further litigation, the judges unanimously granted a preliminary injunction to prevent any move. “That was a major victory for us,” Prosin says. “It means the court thinks our appeal has a decent chance of success.”That’s a fair assessment, says Richard Cupp, a law professor at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, and a noted opponent of personhood for animals. But he still doesn’t think NhRP is going to win. “The weight of precedent and reasoning goes so strongly against these cases,” says Cupp, who would rather see a focus on animal welfare than animal rights. “Animal personhood is an artificial and unrealistic concept,” he says. “Language won’t help these creatures—human responsibility will.”The appellate court likely won’t issue a decision for a few weeks. Prosin says that if NhRP loses it will appeal to the state’s highest court. A positive outcome there could grant chimpanzees personhood throughout New York. But a negative outcome could have the opposite effect, Cupp says, setting a statewide legal precedent that animals cannot be legal persons. “This could backfire on them.”Meanwhile, Prosin says she expects an appellate court to hear the Kiko case in early December. NhRP’s attempt to appeal the Hercules and Leo case was dismissed on technical grounds, but the group will file a new appeal next month. Prosin says that as far as she knows both chimps still reside in a lab at Stony Brook, where they are the subjects of experiments to understand the evolution of human bipedalism. (A university representative would not comment on the case, citing the ongoing litigation.)Regardless of what happens in any of these cases, Prosin says her group is already preparing personhood lawsuits in other states. The next target, she says, will likely be a pair of elephants living in a zoo or circus. NhRP also has more chimpanzees in its sights, though Prosin won’t say if they are research chimps. “We’re feeling really hopeful going forward.” Click to view the privacy policy. 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Country Chimpanzees are back in court. Today, judges in New York state heard the first in a series of appeals attempting to grant “legal personhood” to the animals. The case is part of a larger effort by an animal rights group known as the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) to free a variety of creatures—from research chimps to aquarium dolphins—from captivity.Late last year, NhRP filed lawsuits in three New York lower courts on behalf of four captive chimpanzees in the state. Two—Tommy and Kiko—live in cages on private property, according to the group. The other two—Hercules and Leo—are lab chimps at Stony Brook University. The litigation was spearheaded by Steven Wise, a prominent animal rights lawyer and NhRP’s founder, who spent years consulting with scientists, policy experts, and other lawyers to hone a strategy. His group settled on filing a writ of habeas corpus, which allows a person being held captive to have a say in court. Any judge that granted the writ would be tacitly acknowledging that a chimpanzee is a legal person and thus must be freed from its current confines.That didn’t happen: All three lower courts dismissed the lawsuits. So NhRP appealed, and Wise argued the first of those appeals this afternoon. Making his case for Tommy in front of a five-judge panel and a packed courthouse, he contended that chimpanzees are so cognitively and genetically similar to humans that they deserve a fundamental right to bodily liberty. He wants Tommy—and eventually the other chimpanzees—moved to a sanctuary in Florida. Wise didn’t have any pushback: Tommy’s owners didn’t appear in court, and they didn’t file legal briefs challenging the case.last_img read more