Brazilian Army Soldiers and Police Improve Security with Operation Curaretinga

first_imgBy Dialogo December 23, 2014 Security mission also provided health and dental services to civilians To fight illegal logging, the Army relies on information provided by the Comprehensive Amazônia Protection System (SIPAM). Satellite images provided by SIPAM allow troops to locate and respond to regions where illegal groups are engaging in deforestation. The Soldiers, along with nearly 100 police officers and civilian representatives from various government institutions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), participated in the operation through patrols established in northern Brazil to combat drug trafficking, arms smuggling, environmental crimes and other criminal schemes. In one instance on November 17, at a highway checkpoint in southern Amazonas, Soldiers and officers with the Amazonas State Military Police arrested a group of men who were allegedly transporting 43.5 kg of marijuana in a vehicle. A day later at the same checkpoint, troops and police seized 5 kilograms of cocaine base that someone was trying to transport inside a vehicle. The Civil Police of Porto Velho are investigating both cases. Violence associated with drug and weapons trafficking often poses a threat to those who live along the border, but the successes of Operation Curaretinga have helped locals rest easier. The searches conducted by Soldiers and police officers at security checkpoints have repeatedly led to arrests and seizures of smuggled drugs and arms. Fighting drug trafficking In one instance on November 17, at a highway checkpoint in southern Amazonas, Soldiers and officers with the Amazonas State Military Police arrested a group of men who were allegedly transporting 43.5 kg of marijuana in a vehicle. A day later at the same checkpoint, troops and police seized 5 kilograms of cocaine base that someone was trying to transport inside a vehicle. The Civil Police of Porto Velho are investigating both cases. “During the weekend of December 13 and 14, together with the Rondônia Court of Justice, we brought itinerant notaries public to nearby communities, where they performed several weddings,” Col. Mattos said. “This action even involved our musicians.” The Soldiers, along with nearly 100 police officers and civilian representatives from various government institutions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), participated in the operation through patrols established in northern Brazil to combat drug trafficking, arms smuggling, environmental crimes and other criminal schemes. On another instance on November 23, two men ambushed troops from the 17th Brigade as they conducted a foot patrol in the community of Boa Vista. Fortunately, no Soldiers were injured, and they managed to pursue their assailants into the bush. One suspect, a Brazilian national, was arrested on suspicion of conspiring with the attackers. Even as they work to protect the population from the violence of drug and weapons traffickers, participants in Operation Curaretinga also maintained vigil over the environment, fighting illegal loggers and animal traffickers. To fight illegal logging, the Army relies on information provided by the Comprehensive Amazônia Protection System (SIPAM). Satellite images provided by SIPAM allow troops to locate and respond to regions where illegal groups are engaging in deforestation. From November 19-30, about 1,000 troops from the Brazilian Army’s 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade completed the most recent iteration of Operation Curaretinga, a series of security patrols along nearly 3,000 kilometers of the Brazilian-Bolivian border. “These searches are very important and the local population has responded well, and cooperated by providing information, because we bring a sense of security to these people. Sometimes, the Army is the only institution that reaches out to them,” said Col. Mattos. “Our Brigade is always patrolling the borders. We conduct large-scale operations, such as Curare, and smaller ones, like Curaretinga,” said Colonel Robson Monteiro Mattos, Operations Officer for the 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade. Security officials also seized weapons at multiple checkpoints: two pistols and a shotgun on BR-364, a major roadway linking São Paulo with northern Brazil, and two more shotguns in Acre. During the latter incident, law enforcement officers transported three suspects found in possession of the weapons to the municipality of Rodrigues Alves, where judicial authorities issued arrest warrants for illegal possession of firearms. Security officials also seized weapons at multiple checkpoints: two pistols and a shotgun on BR-364, a major roadway linking São Paulo with northern Brazil, and two more shotguns in Acre. During the latter incident, law enforcement officers transported three suspects found in possession of the weapons to the municipality of Rodrigues Alves, where judicial authorities issued arrest warrants for illegal possession of firearms. “These searches are very important and the local population has responded well, and cooperated by providing information, because we bring a sense of security to these people. Sometimes, the Army is the only institution that reaches out to them,” said Col. Mattos. “During the weekend of December 13 and 14, together with the Rondônia Court of Justice, we brought itinerant notaries public to nearby communities, where they performed several weddings,” Col. Mattos said. “This action even involved our musicians.” Sensors help locate deforested areas Near the municipality of Guajará-Mirim, for example, Soldiers and police seized 381 logs of illegally extracted timber valued at $79,749. They also arrested several suspects in connection with the seizure, and given an Order of Seizure and Destruction from the Brazilian Environmental and Renewable Natural Resources Institute (Ibama), demolished the timber. “Our Brigade is always patrolling the borders. We conduct large-scale operations, such as Curare, and smaller ones, like Curaretinga,” said Colonel Robson Monteiro Mattos, Operations Officer for the 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade. Fighting drug trafficking Violence associated with drug and weapons trafficking often poses a threat to those who live along the border, but the successes of Operation Curaretinga have helped locals rest easier. The searches conducted by Soldiers and police officers at security checkpoints have repeatedly led to arrests and seizures of smuggled drugs and arms. From November 19-30, about 1,000 troops from the Brazilian Army’s 17th Jungle Infantry Brigade completed the most recent iteration of Operation Curaretinga, a series of security patrols along nearly 3,000 kilometers of the Brazilian-Bolivian border. Security mission also provided health and dental services to civilians Sensors help locate deforested areas Even as they work to protect the population from the violence of drug and weapons traffickers, participants in Operation Curaretinga also maintained vigil over the environment, fighting illegal loggers and animal traffickers. On another instance on November 23, two men ambushed troops from the 17th Brigade as they conducted a foot patrol in the community of Boa Vista. Fortunately, no Soldiers were injured, and they managed to pursue their assailants into the bush. One suspect, a Brazilian national, was arrested on suspicion of conspiring with the attackers. Near the municipality of Guajará-Mirim, for example, Soldiers and police seized 381 logs of illegally extracted timber valued at $79,749. They also arrested several suspects in connection with the seizure, and given an Order of Seizure and Destruction from the Brazilian Environmental and Renewable Natural Resources Institute (Ibama), demolished the timber. Soldiers used pre-existing structures to provide medical and dental treatment, or in their absence built field facilities on the spot. They also took the opportunity to provide health lectures, as well as talks about patriotism. On top of working in favor of the environment, Operation Curaretinga also provided medical and dental services for the civilian population. Participants even helped some locals get married. On top of working in favor of the environment, Operation Curaretinga also provided medical and dental services for the civilian population. Participants even helped some locals get married. Soldiers used pre-existing structures to provide medical and dental treatment, or in their absence built field facilities on the spot. They also took the opportunity to provide health lectures, as well as talks about patriotism.last_img read more

The Long Island Press Drone

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York I need my own drone. Not me personally as a citizen (that would be ridiculous) but as a publisher.A Long Island Press drone (available for sponsorship) would enable us to give timely traffic reports, provide up-to-the-minute surf conditions, look for fugitives and measure the size of the daily sewage leaks from our ever-failing sewer and storm water infrastructure.The possibilities are endless. Aerial views of town employees driving official vehicles home after work. Spotting sharks too close to shore. You get the idea.If the American public has little problem with police departments and the FBI using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology and seems indifferent to disclosures that the National Security Agency (NSA) is harvesting massive amounts of its personal data, then it shouldn’t have a problem with journalistic enterprises enhancing their capabilities with drones. Seems logical to me. Though, admittedly, I’m having troubling locating the drone application form on the Federal Aviation Administration’s website.Recently, my wife and I joined three members of the Long Island Press staff at the premiere of Jeremy Scahill’s documentary film, Dirty Wars—the companion piece to his new book of the same name. The film has been opening to packed houses around the country so I made certain to procure tickets in advance, for fear of being locked out of its debut. When the lights dimmed the five of us comprised exactly 50 percent of the audience.Well done, Long Island.Instead of being chagrined by this lack of intellectual curiosity among my fellow Islanders, I chose to view this remarkable display of apathy in a positive light.Since many of you missed it, I’ll give you the upshot of the film. Dirty Wars shines a light on the secret, corrupt and illegal wars being conducted against nations we are not at war with. Scahill’s meticulously researched, first-hand accounts of the devastation being wrought by the excessive utilization of drones have put the Obama administration in an awkward position. The recent NSA spying revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden in The Guardian further compound the administration’s problem with respect to human rights and civil liberties. The fact that the Department of Justice under President Barack Obama has brought more charges of espionage (a charge that potentially carries the death penalty) against Americans than all other presidents combined speaks volumes about Obama’s desire to silence critics and whistleblowers alike.Further, the fact that the administration was forced to admit to killing four U.S. citizens (that we know of) with drone strikes abroad doesn’t seem to have rankled too many of my fellow Long Islanders that much, either. So, like I said, I’m taking this as a tacit show of support for the Press acquiring its very own drone for “surveillance” purposes.There is one more thing. Because I am licensed by Nassau County to carry a weapon and am the owner of the Press, it’s only logical that my drone should be treated as an extension of me and should also be armed. You know, just in case. Rest assured that I would only use it to strike “high-value targets” who threaten our way of life here on Long Island. And, of course, before using my drone for surveillance purposes or (insert flowery euphemism for assassination here) I would seek approval from my secret hand-picked cadre of advisors from the Press.That’s how the government programs work. And everyone is cool with that, right? CIA Director John Brennan comes up with a targeted kill list; runs it by a whole bunch of people in the executive branch, then asks the POTUS for permission to pull the trigger. That’s, like, so many people (from one branch of government) who have to determine (rubber stamp) who gets killed remotely in countries that we’re not at war with (except as designated by the executive branch under a perverted interpretation of authority granted under the AUMF law—look it up.) Surveillance in this country goes through just as arduous a process. The NSA has to ask the secret FISA court for permission in secret to secretly wiretap anyone so long as everyone involved keeps it a secret. Just in case, as Edward Snowden confirmed for us, the NSA has been secretly listening to everything we’ve been saying for quite some time now. They even made secret agreements with outside contractors to build secret facilities to store any and every piece of data secretly collected from around the world.Arduous indeed! This is the process the president recently called “transparent.”Because commercial licenses for drones have been suspended until the FAA issues new guidelines for their use, I’m invoking my privilege under the First Amendment to procure and operate my drone. How so? My drone is essentially like having a super-reporter on staff. Therefore its actions and the data it collects should be protected as free speech. (If unlimited campaign contributions are protected as free speech, this argument can’t be too far off-base.)We are numb. Since 9/11 we have stood by passively during the greatest erosion of domestic civil liberties since the Alien and Sedition Acts and allowed our government to commit atrocities in faraway nations that have succeeded more in fostering antipathy toward our country than the purported purpose of protecting the homeland. Corporate media have furthered the government narrative instead of being a bulwark against it, thus normalizing egregious and unconstitutional behavior in the name of national security. Trusting me with a drone is no more ridiculous than allowing the executive branch to unilaterally determine which civil liberties and human rights to recognize, as if an option exists.The overarching point that must be understood is that the Obama administration has amplified the assault on our rights in a way that would make Richard Nixon blush and Dick Cheney chortle villainously. The president has discarded every protection granted to the citizenry of the United States—and by proxy the world—that he is sworn to cherish and uphold.Unfortunately, my ridiculous example of purchasing a drone is about as serious as the discourse taking place in the media regarding Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning. These two men understand what is at stake right now more than every corporate shill actor hired to read news that has been vetted and approved by the government and corporate masters they serve.last_img read more

Fast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 30-23 loss to Middle Tennessee State

first_img Published on September 9, 2017 at 7:33 pm Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langer In Scott Shafer’s first game back in the Carrier Dome since being fired in 2015, Syracuse (1-1) was unable to down its former head coach. Middle Tennessee State (1-1) pulled away late and stopped SU one yard short on fourth down to pull off the 30-23 upset. This was the Orange’s first game against an FBS opponent this year.Here are three quick reactions from the game.Same scheme, different teamScott Shafer’s defense at Syracuse was known for constantly bringing pressure and trying to rush the quarterback. Earlier in the week Zaire Franklin called it “football 101” that hitting the quarterback is a good way to slow him down. He also said that quarterback Eric Dungey would have to, “be prepared for the fire that’s going to come to him.”Even though SU knew what was coming, it didn’t seem to know how to stop it in the first half. The first two drives both ended in punts for the Orange. SU was in third-and-long each time and Shafer brought extra defenders. Dungey got sacked both times.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDungey was sacked three times in total in the first half. He repeatedly took shots from MTSU’s pressure, though. On one first-quarter play, a third-and-16, Dungey took off and gained five yards but stopped before going out of bounds and got knocked over. In the third quarter Dungey left the game for a series after being targeted by a Blue Raider. He returned on the next possession.None if by landOne of the top priorities for SU in the offseason was improving its lackluster running game from a year ago. SU was retuning a relatively young offensive line, but one that was confident things would be better. Franklin called running back Dontae Strickland the most improved player on the team during training camp.The Orange couldn’t get anything going last week against Central Connecticut State, as Strickland and Moe Neal combined for just 56 yards on 19 carries. Things didn’t get much better against Middle Tennessee State.The first half ended with SU gaining under 40 yards on over 20 carries and the leading rusher for the Orange was fullback Chris Elmore.Syracuse’s most effective threat on the ground was when it ran inside receiver Ervin Philips on sweep plays. And Dungey did manage to score a 29-yard rushing touchdown to tie the game early in the fourth quarter. But for the second straight game, SU’s rushing game gave it close to nothing.Feeling gassedWhile the Orange offense failed to convert on its opportunities in the first half, the defense kept it in the game. Syracuse limited Middle Tennessee State to nine points and 143 yards of offense in the first half. The defense also forced two fumbles and picked off a Brent Stockstill pass.Things didn’t stay that way in the second half. The Blue Raiders had nickled-and-dimed the Orange on screen passes earlier in the game, but now more deep plays were opening up.Wide receiver Richie James scored a touchdown to tie the game late in the third quarter streaking down the middle of the field from his position in the slot for a 28-yard score. To start the fourth quarter, Blue Raider Ty Lee burned Chris Fredrick on a streak for a 48-yard score. SU’s defenders spent decent chunks of the fourth quarter with their hands on their hips, looking tired.MTSU took the lead for good when receiver Shane Tucker caught a ball in the flat near the goal line. Cornerback Juwan Dowels tried to tackle him low, so Tucker leapt over him and into the end zone. A defense that had kept the Orange in it for most of the day had run out of plays. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more