Deadline for Nestlé Social Commitment Award

 11 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Today is the deadline for nominations to the Nestlé Social Commitment award. This is designed to recognised a food industry company and its charity partners.Contact Alison Cayton. Deadline for Nestlé Social Commitment Award AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 18 July 2000 | News Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

Francophone organisation asked to help save French-language daily facing sudden liquidation

first_img RSF_en Receive email alerts CambodiaAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information to go further CambodiaAsia – Pacific February 24, 2021 Find out more News Cambodian journalist gets 20 months in jail for livestream Google experiments drop Australian media from search results RSF decries Cambodian plan for Chinese-style “Great Firewall” January 21, 2021 Find out more News June 13, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Francophone organisation asked to help save French-language daily facing sudden liquidation News News Organisation Reporters Without Borders is outraged at yesterday’s decision by the owners of the French-language daily Cambodge Soir to close the newspaper, just two days after unfairly dismissing its news editor for publishing extracts from a long report on illegal logging that was critical of the government.The press freedom organisation voiced its solidarity with the newspapers 30 employees – 14 of them journalists – who could all lose their jobs, and called on Abdou Diouf, the secretary-general of the International Organisation of Francophone Countries (OIF), to intercede.”The OIF has for years been supporting Cambodge Soir, which has become a landmark of the French-language media in Asia and had produced many talented French and Cambodian journalists,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Although your organisation had just released new funds to support this newspaper, its management has decided to terminate this 12-year-old venture on the grounds of financial difficulties. We ask you to help prevent the disappearance of this exemplary French-language daily.”Cambodge Soir’s owners, among them minority shareholder Philippe Monin, yesterday told its staff that the liquidation of the newspaper and the company that publishes it, Société des Editions du Mékong, had already begun. The announcement came just one day after the newspaper’s journalists began a strike in protest against the summary dismissal of news editor Soren Seelow for publishing a detailed story based on a report by the environmental group Global Witness implicating associates of Prime Minister Hun Sen in illegal logging.The story did not please Monin and the newspaper’s managing editor, who summoned Seelow on 10 June and told him he was fired.Monin, who is also employed by the French Development Agency (AFD) to act as a adviser for the Cambodian agriculture ministry, told Seelow that his article would upset the authorities and put him in a difficult position.The Cambodian government has banned publication of the report in full or in part, while the prime minister’s brother, Hun Neng, reportedly said that if anyone from Global Witness came to Cambodia, he would “beat them on the head until it broke.”Cambodge Soir’s striking employees meanwhile issued a statement today condemning Seelow’s summary dismissal, the meddling in its editorial policies and the fact that the newspaper seems to have no future.Reporters Without Borders contacted Monin, who has been a shareholder since the newspaper was launched in 1995, but he refused to make any comment.A Cambodia-based journalist who spoke to Reporters Without Borders on condition of anonymity claimed that the new managing editor hired by Cambodge Soir’s board last September had been given the job of “sabotaging” the newspaper.With support from the French embassy, the staff recently launched several new projects including a website (which is down today) and special sections to cover the trial of Khmer Rouge members. But the managing editor allegedly did several things to undermine these initiatives, including abruptly suspending an advertising sales contract in December.Cambodge Soir had a reputation for editorial independence, compared with its French-language counterparts in Laos and Vietnam. Despite its limited circulation (about 2,000 copies) and recurring financial difficulties, it had significant impact on the Cambodian media landscape and its reports were often quoted in the Khmer-language press. Follow the news on Cambodia The news editor of the French-language daily Cambodge Soir was fired on 10 June for publishing extracts from an environmental NGO’s report on illegal logging. Then yesterday, the newspaper’s owners, including Philippe Monin, a French consultant working for the Cambodian agriculture ministry, announced that the newspaper is to be liquidated. December 28, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Petition prompts council to call November election

first_img Pinterest Petition prompts council to call November election Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Local NewsGovernment Twitter Pinterest By admin – February 13, 2018 Facebook In the end, a tally showed at least 2,757 Odessa voters had signed the petition — enough to force an election so voters could decide on a proposal to add a new Odessa City Council member and give the mayor a vote, even if the existing City Council refused to voluntarily give Odessans that chance.Finally, a majority of the City Council voted Tuesday to call an election. Just not the May election proponents of the changes wanted.In a 3-2 vote following a heated debate, a majority of council members refused to call a May election. Instead, splitting along those same lines, they called the election in November in a separate vote.The majority was comprised of District 1 Councilman Malcolm Hamilton, District 3 Councilwoman Barbara Graff and District 5 Councilman Filiberto Gonzales. They were also behind a series of controversies that prompted outrage among Odessa voters, including the firing of the city manager, secret meetings and the scuttling of an incentives deal for an oilfield equipment company that never came, among others.But some of the supporters who attended Tuesday still celebrated a successful effort to force an election — something city officials say is the first of its kind in Odessa.“The people of Odessa spoke with that petition that they wanted to see change in our City Council,” said Dottie Chavez, a school counselor who helped collect signatures during the petition drive, which began in December after the same three City Council members refused to voluntarily call an election. Chavez said she was proud Odessans will get to vote on the changes even after the City Council’s decision to block the vote in May.“The main reason is because we want to get things moving in a different direction immediately,” she said.There were other mixed emotions among petitioners. Kirk Edwards, a former District 2 Councilman, said he wanted the May election like fellow supporters of the changes but was not disappointed. The council is scheduled to cast a second and final vote calling the election later this month.“The good news from tonight is there will be an election this year, which will allow the people, the citizens of Odessa, to decide if they want an at-large position and allow the mayor to vote,” said Edwards, an Odessa oilman. “And that’s what the petition was about.”For a moment, it appeared the council might reject both items calling for an election, as Hamilton hesitated before the final aye vote.“What is this for that we are voting for?” he said, before voting with Graff and Gonzales.A series of back-and-forths, barbs and winding arguments had preceded the vote.Supporters of the May election, District 2 Councilman Dewey Bryant and District 4 Councilman Mike Gardner, made impassioned arguments about following the will of Odessans.“Do the citizens really have anything that they can do or say in this city?” Bryant said.Graff delivered a winding interpretation on the meaning of state law that conflicted at times with what the Texas Secretary of State’s office had outlined. She argued the council gets to choose an election date (the state had said they don’t). She suggested the council could revise the proposed changes before voters get to vote on them. And she said the whole charter amendment that she ultimately voted to advance to voters might be illegal because it involves more than one change.“Do you follow the voice of the people or do you follow the law?” Graff said.But proponents, including the supporters on the City Council, argued there was nothing wrong about calling an election for May in a single vote. The deadline to get on the May ballot is Feb. 16. And the City Council has called November elections for years with a single vote ahead of a ballot deadline.City Attorney Larry Long said they could not use a so-called “emergency measure” that allows an election to be called in one vote in this case. That was disputed.“…In the past it’s been done by this council,” Gardner said, adding later that “if the voters in Odessa say ‘No we don’t want this, then they’ll vote no, we don’t want to do that.’ But they have spoken and said let’s have the election May 5. I don’t know why we would not want to do that.”Graff blamed organizers of the petition drive for not turning in the results earlier. So did Gonzales.“Yes we had some people that signed the petition,” Gonzales said. “Yes they did what they were supposed to do. But they missed the deadlines. They had some inadequate people that didn’t do their homework on when they were supposed to turn in the petition. Why is it the City Council’s fault? It is what it is.”But in many cases, the council members who opposed the May election just argued why they don’t like the proposed changes to the board or the election.Gonzales and Mayor David Turner squared off at one point, Gonzales and Gardner at another. Hamilton chided Bryant, City Attorney Larry Long, the mayor and Gonzales. And he also made broad accusations against supporters of the changes, including that they had committed “crime.” He refused to explain that or name who he was talking about when pressed by Turner. “You’re upset because we did something that you didn’t like, possibly because of self-interest, not because of the greater good of Odessa,” Hamilton said to proponents of the council changes.Tension resurfaced over Odessa’s eastward growth in recent years, as Hamilton, like Gonzales before, focused on development and backed off arguments about racial discrimination.“Stop putting business over people,” Hamilton said, without being specific. “This is not about a Hispanic thing. This is not about a black thing. This is not about a white thing. This is about a dollar thing.”None of that was really about calling an election. And the petition, deemed valid Tuesday, did not give the City Council option to refuse calling one.“You forced the citizens to get a petition,” Bryant said to fellow council members. “We this council, forced the citizens to get a petition. They got a petition.” Previous articleDAILY OIL PRICE: Feb. 13Next articleMCH’s Cerner implementation showing progress adminlast_img read more

Students to compete in mini art competition

first_img Sponsored Content Pam Smith, retired Charles Henderson High School art teacher, is putting the show together and said a mini-artworks show is challenging in that the artists must work on a small canvas – a canvas the size of a dollar bill.“Students are challenged to find creative ways to express themselves on a mini-canvas,” Smith said. “What is especially interesting about this student art show is that it is sponsored by a bank, Troy Bank and Trust, and the canvas must be the size of a dollar bill.”The Mini Arworks Show & Competition is open to all area schools, grades K-12. There will be a first, second and third place winner for each category. Ribbons will be awarded. You Might Like Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Skip Published 3:00 am Saturday, August 11, 2018 Students to compete in mini art competition By Jaine Treadwell The Johnson Center for the Arts is getting an early jump on the art center’s annual Student Art Show. This year’s show, titled “Mini Artworks Show and Competition,” is sponsored by Troy Bank and Trust Company and the Johnson Center for the Arts.Wiley White, JCA exhibition coordinator, said the student art show is one of the most viewed shows of the year.“Student participation is excellent and the family members of the young artists and the entire community enjoy seeing their artwork exhibited in a public gallery,” she said. “We are excited about the Mini Artworks Show and Competition and are looking forward to another great student show.” Print Article Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Book Nook to reopencenter_img Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day There will also be a “Best of Show” awarded for each student age division. The teacher of the Best of Show award students will be given $50 to purchase art materials for their classroom. The students will receive ribbons.“What is so exciting about this student art show is that, because the artwork is so small, we will have a lot of exhibition space,” Smith said. “So we will be able to accept more entries; therefore, we have eight categories for entry – drawing, painting, collage, printmaking, photography, graphic design, digital imagery and computer graphics, and mixed media. In each category there will be additional choices; for example, color and black and white, watercolor, tempera and acrylic.” Email the author Pioneer museum renovates roof in preparation for 50th anniversary In the year 2021, the Pioneer Museum of Alabama will celebrate 50 years. For that milestone event, the plan of… read more The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder With school just underway, students might not be thinking about Mini Artworks just yet, but it will be a fun and exciting competition. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Former EDC head James Patchett named CEO of A&E Real Estate

first_img Tags Email Address* Share via Shortlink A&E Real Estate CEO James Patchett (Courtesy of A&E Real Estate)A&E Real Estate has tapped James Patchett, the former president and CEO of the NYC Economic Development Corporation, as its next CEO, the company announced. His arrival at A&E coincides with what the real estate firm says will be a major expansion of its portfolio — already one of the city’s largest with 15,000 apartments.“James has spent virtually his entire career getting to know the unique rhythms and defining characteristics of New York City’s individual neighborhoods,” A&E founder Douglas Eisenberg said in a statement. “His expertise — alongside our fully-integrated team and new fund — gives us the capacity to grow quickly and in new ways.”Patchett left EDC in March, and at the time, the city noted that he was pursuing opportunities in the private sector.Read moreThese are NYC’s largest rental landlords of 2020Deutsche Bank provided A&E $97M in financing for big Rego Park buyA&E Real Estate buys huge rent-stabilized portfolio at deep discount Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Full Name* A&E is a relative newcomer to the city’s multifamily market; it was founded by Eisenberg in 2011, and has since grown to rival incumbents like LeFrak and Related Companies in terms of its real estate footprint. It’s done so by following the model of other multifamily firms: by buying older, often rent-stabilized buildings in need of upgrades. Its major deals include the acquisition of a 32-building portfolio from Dermot in 2015.But the firm is aiming to shake up its strategy, targeting new asset types and the acquisition of development rights on sites that are currently part of its portfolio. It plans to launch a $1 billion fund to make that happen.Patchett’s experience at EDC will help with A&E’s larger development goals; he was involved in some of the biggest (and most controversial) real estate projects of the past decade, including the Bedford-Union Armory redevelopment, the creation of the Union Square Tech Hub and the expansion of the Brooklyn Army Terminal. But his tenure was marked by some big disappointments — namely, the loss of Amazon’s proposed HQ2 in Long Island City.“I was immediately drawn to A&E given its commitment and track record when it comes to enhancing communities and providing residents with the best in workforce housing,” Patchett said in a statement. “We see the same opportunity in the city’s recovery, and we want to be a part of investing in the future of the middle class and the neighborhoods in which they live and work.”Patchett’s old boss, former deputy mayor Alicia Glen, made a similar move from the public sector to real estate when she left the de Blasio administration in 2019. Last year, she founded a new real estate firm, Msquared. Patchett — who worked for her at Goldman Sachs’ urban investment group and then City Hall — did not follow her to that firm.Contact Sasha Jones A&E Real EstateDevelopment Message*last_img read more

After JC meeting attorney general tells prosecutors to hold off on…

first_img× JERSEY CITY – After a July 23 meeting between Jersey City officials and state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal, an agreement was reached regarding Jersey City’s attempt to pull back from prosecuting marijuana offenders.After the city prosecutor and Mayor Steven Fulop introduced a policy of not prosecuting first-time offenders, the state’s attorney general said the city had no authority to make such a change. But a July 24 a memo from Grewal, issued to all 21 county prosecutors, directed a 30-day adjournment of all marijuana charges, pending soon-to-be developed statewide guidelines for downgrading and dismissing low-level marijuana offenses.“This is a huge win for Jersey City, the state of New Jersey, and most importantly the people who would have been impacted by the creation of a criminal record due to a simple marijuana arrest,” said Fulop. “We are excited that Attorney General Grewal and Jersey City found common ground, avoiding the collateral consequences of convictions for marijuana possession while our great state is on the cusp of legalization.”On July 18, Fulop and Jersey City Chief Prosecutor Jake Hudnut announced that the city would either dismiss simple marijuana possession cases in the municipal courts or amend such charges to local ordinance violations, effectively decriminalizing marijuana in Jersey City.But on July 20, Grewal voided the policy. But on July 23, “in light of public support for the policy” according to the release, Jersey City officials from the Municipal Prosecutor’s office, the Department of Public Safety, and the Law Department met with Grewal to discuss how decriminalization can be implemented both in Jersey City and across New Jersey.Grewal will convene a working group of criminal justice stakeholders this summer – including Hudnut – to study the issue and advise the attorney general on statewide solutions to achieve the similar aims to decriminalization, but in accordance with existing state law and court rules.Grewal’s July 24 directive will provide guidance on when to downgrade or dismiss marijuana cases. The aim is to avoid disorderly person misdemeanor convictions for simple possession while New Jersey is on the verge of legalization of marijuana, as well as looking at the consequences that come with those convictions, which could include driver’s license suspension, criminal records, loss of student financial aid, bans from public housing, adverse effects on employment opportunities, and loss of immigration status.Grewal has directed all municipal prosecutors to seek adjournments of open marijuana cases until after Sept. 4, pending the new guidelines from the attorney general. The measure, according to the city, could amount to a moratorium or a substantial reduction in marijuana convictions in New Jersey between now and legalization.last_img read more

Listen To Jerry Garcia Perform “Deep Elem Blues” & “Raw Hide” In These Rare Early Recordings

first_imgOn May 11th, a brand-new Jerry Garcia box set will be released via Round Records. Titled Before The Dead, predictably, the new box set compiles rare (many, previously unreleased) recordings of Jerry, showcasing his early beginnings before the Grateful Dead.Before Jerry fully leaned into the psychedelic jam scene, he had a deep-seated love for folk music, playing small gigs with bluegrass and jug bands and various partners in the Bay Area from 1961 to 1964—beginning with a recording from Garcia’s girlfriend at the time’s 16th birthday party.As such, Before The Dead collects tracks from these formative early years, containing recordings of Jerry performing with the Black Mountain Boys, The Wildwood Boys, Hart Valley Drifters, and Sleepy Hollow Hog Stompers, as well as Robert Hunter, Marshall Leicester, and others. Today, Rolling Stone Country premiered two tracks from the Before The Dead box set, offering up a recording of Jerry Garcia and Sara Ruppenthal—who Garcia would go on to marry—performing “Deep Elem Blues” as a duet as well as the Black Mountain Boys’ take on Bill Monroe’s “Raw Hide”.According to the box set’s notes, Jerry and Sara’s performance of “Deep Elem Blues” took place on May 4th, 1963, at Top of the Tangent in Palo Alto, California, with the number marking their first of six songs. “Deep Elem Blues” is a classic tune, which appears to have first been recorded by the Lone Star Cowboys in 1933, a group composed of Joe and Bob Attlesey and Leon Chappelear. In these years before the Dead, Garcia got acquainted with the song, with “Deep Elem Blues” eventually making its way into the Grateful Dead’s repertoire. The Grateful Dead first performed the classic song in December 1966 and continued to play it up until 1983–just about fifty times in total. Jerry Garcia would continue to perform the track with his various projects up until the late 80s, primarily with the Jerry Garcia Acoustic Band or with John Kahn as a duo. You can take a listen to Jerry Garcia and Sara Ruppenthal’s take on “Deep Elem Blues” from the upcoming Before The Dead box set, which was premiered on Rolling Stone Country earlier today, below.The box set’s recording of Black Mountain Boys’ rendition of “Raw Hide” was captured a little less than a year later, on March 6th, 1964, at the same venue, Top of the Tangent in Palo Alto. At the time, Black Mountain Boys was composed of Garcia, Geoff Levin, David Nelson (New Riders of the Purple Sage), and Sandy Rothman.  Following the opening song, “In The Pines”, the Black Mountain Boys lay out an instrumental rendition of the Bill Monroe classic, eventually segueing it into a take on the traditional tune “Black Mountain Rag”. You can take a listen to Black Mountain Boys’ take on “Deep Elem Blues” from the upcoming Before The Dead box set, which was premiered on Rolling Stone Country earlier today, below.The Before The Dead box set is likely to be a treasure for any Grateful Dead enthusiast or collector. The box set was co-produced and curated by longtime Grateful Dead author and publicist Dennis McNally and documentarian Brian Miksis. It highlights Jerry Garcia’s transition from folk to rock, giving insight into Garcia’s early years and how these bluegrass and folk influences later manifested within the Grateful Dead. The Before The Dead box set will be released on May 11th, with the box set available as a four-CD set or a limited-edition five-LP set on 180-gram vinyl. In addition to the recordings, which were restored and mastered by Fred Kevorkian, the box set also comes with a 32-page booklet of essays from McNally and Miksis, as well as detailed song notes from musicologist Dr. Neil V. Rosenberg. You can pre-order the Before The Dead box set here.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

Traffickers Said To Abuse Brazil-Bound Haitians

first_img Acre authorities meanwhile are expressing growing alarm over the influx of Haitians seeking a better life after fleeing their impoverished homeland devastated by an earthquake two years ago. “Many of the Haitians arrive sick, with evidence of ill-treatment on their skin but they refuse to press for action against the coyotes,” as the smugglers are known, Mourao said. He said the migrants pay between $1,500 and $5,000 to traffickers in exchange for air passage from Port-au-Prince to Ecuador and Colombia from where they trek to Brazil via Peru and Bolivia. Between December 31 and January 2, at least 539 Haitians illegally entered Acre through the border with Peru, officials said. Booming Brazil, Latin America’s dominant economy, has become the choice destination for Haitian and Bolivian migrants lured by ongoing massive infrastructure projects linked to the country’s hosting of the 2014 football World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics. “Right now, there are 1,250 Haitians claiming refugee status in (the border town of) Brasileia. Most do not meet the requirements but receive a two-year humanitarian visa with the right to work,” said Nilson Mourao, an official of the Justice and Human Rights group in Acre. The influx, which began in February 2010 shortly after the quake, has been accelerating in recent days. By Dialogo January 06, 2012 The official added that in Brasileia, a town of 20,000, the Haitians were being sheltered in holding centers where authorities are providing food and medical care. Haitians seeking refuge in Brazil are being abused and cheated on their way by traffickers in neighboring Peru and Bolivia, a human rights official in the northwestern Brazilian state of Acre said January 4. Brazil also leads the UN peacekeeping contingent in Haiti.last_img read more

Guaidó Leads on Venezuela’s COVID-19 Response

first_imgBy Noelani Kirschner/ShareAmerica May 14, 2020 While the Nicolás Maduro regime lies to the public about Venezuela’s confirmed coronavirus cases and its hospitals’ preparedness, Interim President Juan Guaidó and the National Assembly are taking a transparent and truthful leadership role in the COVID-19 response.“Information is a key element to face the pandemic,” Guaidó said on Twitter. “Venezuela is in our hands.”Guaidó and the National Assembly released on April 9 a free and accessible online platform to help Venezuelans diagnose their symptoms and connect them with medical health professionals.Anyone experiencing virus-like symptoms can send a message through WhatsApp, receive a link to a survey about their symptoms and be put in touch with a medical professional who will provide medical advice and suggest next steps.On April 12, the National Assembly issued a new WhatsApp number, denouncing the Maduro regime’s attempts to hack the first one. But the National Assembly noted that, before closing, the first line had received more than 20,000 visits in just three days.“The attack on this tool represents an attack on the Venezuelan people, who are entitled to know the truth,” the National Assembly said in a statement.Guaidó and the National Assembly will continue to work with international aid organizations to help Venezuelans receive supplies during the COVID-19 crisis. They are also releasing, in conjunction with a team of doctors, scientifically researched information about COVID-19 to keep the public updated.“Venezuela is one of the most vulnerable countries to an outbreak of coronavirus because of the complex humanitarian emergency that we have denounced for years,” Guaidó said in a video on the National Assembly’s website. “That exposes us much more, and for that reason, we are going to take measures.”last_img read more

Freeport Defenders Speak Out Against Princesses: Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Princesses: Long Island debuted June 2 on Bravo.Long Islanders gathered at E.B. Elliot’s on Freeport’s Nautical Mile to rally Friday against Princesses: Long Island, the new Bravo reality show they say gives viewers the wrong idea about LI residents.Among those who showed were Jewish residents of the village offended by the stereotypes on the show, local Superstorm Sandy survivors who feel slighted by comments made about debris and a local rap group that wrote a song about the show after one of the cast called Freeport a “ghetto.”“I hope that all this makes Bravo realize that what they are representing is not reality,” said Kimberly Creed Llompart, a Freeport resident who organized the event and formed the “Boycott Princesses of Long Island” Facebook group. “I was happy to see people in the community stand up for what is right.”She and others hope that the show will not be renewed for a second season. The third episode airs at 9 p.m. Sunday on Bravo.Nice and Ill, a rap group that includes Joey Jack, Chris Mills, and Jason Yarde, were shocked when Ashlee White, one of the “princesses,” called Freeport a “ghetto,” so they made the song defending the village. They performed their song, “Bravo,” which received almost 40,000 hits on YouTube in two days at the event.“People outside of New York who watch the show are going to think, ‘Ew that’s how all Long Islanders are,’” Mills said. “No, this is false. This isn’t Long Island.”Jack notes how White’s comment about the couches on the street was insensitive because he, along with many people in the community, were affected by the devastation of Sandy and some are still rebuilding.Jenna Jones, who has lived in Freeport for 43 years, said that she was particularly offended by the Jewish stereotypes portrayed in the show because she is Jewish herself.“We chose Freeport because of the diversity,” she said. “We wanted to raise our children in the real world.”Former Freeport resident Grace Byrne Greene flew in from Key Largo, Fla. to show her support after being infuriated by how the show portrayed the village, particularly by including police sirens and focusing in on rundown houses. She worries about the impact on property values after the show “portrayed Freeport in the most disparaging light.”She added that she invited Bravo representatives to the event to apologize, but they failed to show up. White has since apologized for calling Freeport a ghetto.“We’re hurt that someone would depict Freeport in that way,” said Anita Scott, another Freeport resident who lost everything from Sandy and is staying with her son. “You’re insulting all of us.”“After Sandy, everyone in the community was looking out for one another,” she said. “That’s Freeport. It’s not a ghetto.”last_img read more