Labor Day’s Missing Message

first_img Previous articleClosing CommentsNext articleDuPont Pioneer Agronomy Update 9/5/16 Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Labor Day’s Missing Message Well, here we are again, that three-day weekend that marks the unofficial end of summer. That is what most Americans think of when they think at all about Labor Day.  For a large number of American workers, both white and blue collar, Labor Day is about shopping, eating food, and drinking beer. Not that these things are bad, but there is a message missing from the Labor Day celebration.According to a survey by Anheuser Busch, 214 million Americans (67%) plan to fire up the grill this year. The top 4 meat items on the grill are hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken, and steak. Not surprisingly, the survey showed that a many of those barbecuers will drink a beer. 98M Americans (44% of barbecue-goers) will drink an ice-cold domestic beer, while only 49M (22%) will drink an imported beer. According to the survey at a Labor Day BBQ, those drinking domestic beer are perceived as more “genuine and approachable.” Frankly, I am not sure what the heck that means. The fact is, however, that sales of imported beer significantly outpace sales of domestic beer. The folks at Budweiser assume that a “domestic” beer means a Bud. In reality, it more likely means a craft beer, brewed locally. Ironically, most of the big national brewers are now actually owned by international holding companies. So while the beer is brewed here, the profits go elsewhere.The craft brewing industry is exploding. There are over 90 local breweries in Indiana and more opening all the time.  The craft beer industry in the Hoosier State has grown at a rate that has even outpaced the biofuels sector. In Ohio, lawmakers passed a bill that eliminated the maximum permitted alcohol content of beer. The law, which went into effect last week, repeals the 12 percent alcohol by volume limit in Ohio. The legislation is directly relates to craft breweries, and local officials are hoping that change ties into the potential for economic development. Currently, there are over 150 local breweries in Ohio generating over 1.5 billion dollars in sales.Nationally, craft beer sales have been growing at double-digit rates for the past several years and, as of 2014, accounted for 11% of the U.S. beer market. It is expected craft beer will account for 20% of the U.S. beer market by 2020. This growth is having an impact on agriculture since the main ingredients in beer are grains and hops.  Traditionally, hops have only been grown in western states; but, with the overwhelming demand, more and more local farmers are trying their hand at growing hops to meet the demand of local brewers.Talk about a local food movement — you can grow the ingredients, process them, and consume them all in one community. IUPUI in Indianapolis is now even offering classes in brewery management. It is estimated that craft brewers currently provide an estimated 424,000 jobs in the U.S.But, what does this have to do with Labor Day? Simply this: while labor and labor unions have had a lot to do with the economic might of this country, it is innovation and individual entrepreneurs that have really made us great. Individuals coming up with ideas and turning them into businesses are the real success stories. Small businesses built this nation; and, today, craft breweries, catering to changing American tastes for beer, are keeping that tradition alive. Whether it is farmers down a county road, merchants on Main Street in the county seat, or craft brew houses popping up in small towns and big cities, innovation and small business is the key to what Labor Day is really all about.If you spent your Labor Day grilling meat and drinking craft beer, the labor movement had little or nothing to do with your celebration. It was the independent American farmer and the local entrepreneur that put the meat on your grill and the beer in your glass. So eat up and drink up — because neither the farmers nor the entrepreneurs have federal holidays.By Gary Truitt Home Commentary Labor Day’s Missing Message SHARE Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Sep 4, 2016 SHARElast_img read more

HAT Market Analysis for 2/23/21 with Arlan Suderman of StoneX

first_img SHARE Previous articleNew Officers for Indiana Beef Cattle AssociationNext articleVilsack Confirmed by U.S. Senate to Return to Former Post at USDA, Ag Industry Reacts Andy Eubank Audio Playerhttps://hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Arlan-Suderman-markets-3.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Soybean futures led the way in grain and oilseed trading Tuesday. Livestock futures ended mixed, and a volatile start to the week in equities continued. Arlan Suderman, Chief Commodities Economist with StoneX explains. Click to listen. Facebook Twitter SHARE By Andy Eubank – Feb 23, 2021 HAT Market Analysis for 2/23/21 with Arlan Suderman of StoneX Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News HAT Market Analysis for 2/23/21 with Arlan Suderman of StoneXlast_img read more

Dixon, UCLA engaging in contract talks

first_imgTwitter Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Facebook ReddIt TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers! Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Jamie Dixon watches his team against West Virginia.Photo by Cristian ArguetaSoto Twitter Linkedin Robbie Vaglio Previous articleWhat we’re reading: A first for ChicagoNext articleListen: Ball Don’t Lie: The Rafters Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts Facebook Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Snow temporarily stepping down as honors dean TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed Linkedin Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU ReddIt printTCU men’s basketball coach Jamie Dixon has started to engage in buyout talks with the Horned Frogs to become the next head coach at UCLA, but a deal has yet to be reached, a source told ESPN Wednesday.“He’s trying to negotiate his $8-million buyout down to $1 million,” Ben Bolch of the LA Times said in a tweet. “Barring that, UCLA will have to come up with the money.”Dixon, a native of southern California, earned a two-year extension to his contract after the Horned Frogs reached the NCAA Tournament last season for the first time since 1998. The contract kept him signed through the 2023-24 season. Dixon hardly mentioned the rumors after last night’s 58-44 loss to Texas in the NIT semifinals. “I’ve got a great job,” Dixon said Tuesday night. “I’m very lucky where I’m at. I’ve said that before, there’s nothing I can really say. Very thankful for this opportunity I was given at TCU. It doesn’t feel good right now as far as this loss. That’s what’s so disappointing because it’s just that we’ve been playing so good. We just never got in that rhythm offensively today. That’s the only thing I feel right now.”Dixon has turned the Horned Frogs’ team, which was a bottom-feeder of the Big 12, into a program with NCAA Tournament expectations after going 68-41 during his three-year tenure so far in Fort Worth. Dixon has led TCU to postseason basketball in each of his three years at the helm; the team won the NIT title in his first season, and it made appearances at an NCAA Tournament appearance last season and in the NIT semifinals this year. UCLA, one of college basketball’s blue bloods, is first all-time in national championships with 11. However, the Bruins last made the Final Four in 2008 and have yet to move past the Sweet 16 in the last 11 years. Neither Dixon nor TCU has commented on the contract talks. What to watch during quarantine Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/last_img read more

‘Life After Loss’

first_imgHome Hospice of West TexasHome Hospice of West Texas has scheduled a Life After Loss event in conjunction with the American Cancer Society from 10 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, June 19, 26, July 10, 17, 24, 31 and Aug. 7 at Home Hospice of West Texas, 619 N. Grant, Suite 120.Weekly topics will include “What to Expect,” “The process of Grief,” “Living with Memories,” “Needs when you are Grieving,” “Honoring Special Occasions” and “What Now?”Pre-registration is required.The event is free of charge and open to the public.For more information, call 432-580-9990. Previous articleBig Bend brewers showcased on Vice’s Beerland seriesNext articleLunch and lecture admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook WhatsApp Facebook OC employee of the year always learning Twitter Local News ‘Life After Loss’ Virgin Coco MojitoSlap Your Mama It’s So Delicious Southern Squash CasseroleSouthern Style Potato SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School Pinterest WhatsApp Home Local News ‘Life After Loss’ ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ Pinterest By admin – June 18, 2018 Twitterlast_img read more

CFPB Receives Record Numbers of Complaints During Pandemic

first_img  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago CFPB Congress Kathleen Kraninger 2020-07-30 David Wharton Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Krista F. Brock Previous: COVID-19 Placing Spotlight on Affordability Challenges, Zoning Next: CWCOT Webinar: Insights Into Critical Changes The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has received a record number of consumer complaints during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Director Kathleen Kraninger. During a House Financial Services Committee hearing Thursday, she reported that the Bureau has fielded more than 14,000 complaints over the past few months that were specifically related to the coronavirus.During the hearing, Director Kraninger received a mix of praise and criticism for the Bureau’s actions during the pandemic.Chairwoman Maxine Waters said the CFPB “has done next to nothing” about the record number of complaints, which included those regarding wait times, inconsistent information, and lack of follow-up from financial institutions.Waters alleged that Kraninger has worked toward relaxing enforcement, undermining qualified mortgage standards, and weakening the reporting requirements for the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA).However, Rep. Patrick McHenry countered that the Bureau “has worked diligently to provide resources, guidance, and protection for consumers most at risk during these unsettling times.”He stated that the Bureau has encouraged financial institutions to work with borrowers at risk during the pandemic and has clarified mortgage servicers’ role and responsibility in the forbearance plans created under the CARES Act.The CFPB, along with other federal entities, launched a mortgage and housing assistance website in April to inform people about how to protect their finances during the pandemic. The CFPB has created more than 70 blogs and videos to inform consumers about their rights and available assistance during the pandemic. More than 3 million users have viewed these resources, according to Kraninger.Additionally, Kraninger said the Bureau is currently reviewing hundreds of financial institutions to ensure they are following the CARES Act as well as other financial regulations, and that they are working with consumers during this financial crisis.In addition to its COVID-19 response, over the past few months the CFPB has issued advanced notices of proposed rulemaking regarding the HMDA, the Ability-to-Repay, and the Qualified Mortgage Rules, Kraninger noted. The Bureau has also proposed changes to the higher-priced mortgage loan escrow exemption and is working on an assessment of the Truth in Lending Act and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (TRID).For example, the CFPB is accepting input on whether to extend the GSE patch, which allows mortgages that are eligible for GSE purchase to count as Qualified Mortgages. The GSE Patch is set to expire in January.Kraninger’s testimony comes about a month after the Supreme Court ruled the CFPB’s structure unconstitutional, following an ongoing debate since the bureau’s inception, that the director is given too much power.Kraninger said she agrees with the outcome and stated during the hearing Thursday that, while the decision for a new structure is in the hands of Congress, she is ready to comply. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agocenter_img Sign up for DS News Daily July 30, 2020 1,082 Views The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe CFPB Receives Record Numbers of Complaints During Pandemic Tagged with: CFPB Congress Kathleen Kraninger Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Journal, News Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. Home / Daily Dose / CFPB Receives Record Numbers of Complaints During Pandemiclast_img read more

WEF Challenge Cup Round 1 Won by Lillie Keenan

first_img SIGN UP Lillie Keenan (USA) and Agana Van Het Gerendal Z. (Sportfot photo)Fierce competition was on display in the $37,000 Adequan® WEF Challenge Cup Round 1 CSI3* at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC), with Lillie Keenan (USA) and Agana Van Het Gerendal Z besting a field of 73 combinations on Thursday, January 14.Competition rolls on during Week 1 at the 2021 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) with the $25,000 CaptiveOne Advisors 1.50m Jumper Classic on Friday and Saturday night under the lights with the $137,000 Wellington Regional Medical Center Grand Prix CSI3*. You can catch all the action and tune in to the free livestream of feature classes. Competition at WEF continues for 11 more weeks, through April 4.The scope of international attendance was well represented in the jump-off with riders from seven different nations contesting the shortened course set by Anthony D’Ambrosio (USA) and Andy Christiansen Jr. (ECU). Last to go, Keenan piloted the 11-year-old Zangersheide stallion owned by Chansonette Farm, LLC around the track flawlessly for a double clear effort in a time of 39.95 seconds.“I had a different plan if no one had been clear,” she said. “I knew I could do six down to the combination where a lot of people opted to do seven. In the first round I did seven; my horse is ridiculously talented so really my job is to stay out of his way. So, in that kind of situation with the speed I would be going in a jump-off, the six was simpler, because I was going to do less. Obviously, Shane [Sweetnam] was not only fast but also clear, so what changed was that I not only had to go fast, I had to try to be faster than him and clear.”Returning to the International Arena for the second round, Sweetnam (IRL), aboard Indra Van De Oude Heihoef for The Blue Buckle Group, was the first to execute the jump-off without fault, finishing the day in second place with a time of 40.51 seconds. Cassio Rivetti (BRA) guided Genesis for Neil Jones Equestrian Inc to a third-place finish in the class with a clear effort in 43.15 seconds.Keenan has had the stallion since he was six years old, and their journey to today’s win has been anything but ordinary. If it weren’t for her mom, Pam Keenan, the successful pair would likely have never ended up together.“Honestly, when I tried him, I didn’t want him,” said Keenan. “I knew that he was very talented. He has been winning since he was four years old with his previous riders, always a winner, but I felt that I didn’t necessarily suit him very well. My mom was the one that picked him and was like, ‘You are learning to ride this horse, and we are buying him.’ My mom rides him every single day for me. She was a very successful junior [rider], and then stopped riding for a long time. She’s actually a really tiny lady and awesome rider, and he’s the one horse in the barn I can always trust to put her on even if he’s had some easy days. She does an unbelievable job keeping him happy and keeping him fit, so my job in the ring is really easy.”A native of New York City, NY, Keenan has now relocated to Wellington, FL, full-time as she continues to pursue a career in show jumping. With a farm nearby, Keenan is right around the corner from WEF making it easier to execute her plans for the show season.“I’m very fortunate to have a few different horses, not only my own but for some other people that have chosen to support me, and I’m really lucky with that opportunity that I can kind of diversify my string and try to spread my horses out,” she said. “Right now, it’s full steam ahead and we’re really glad to be back in Wellington.”$37,000 Adequan® WEF Challenge Cup Round 11 AGANA VAN HET GERENDAL Z: 2011 Zangersheide stallion by Aganix Du Seigneur x NaminkaLILLIE KEENAN (USA), Chansonette Farm, LLC: 0/0/39.952 INDRA VAN DE OUDE HEIHOEF: 2008 Belgian Warmblood mare by Casantos x Action-Breaker SHANE SWEETNAM (IRL), The Blue Buckle Group: 0/0/40.513 GENESIS: 2011 KWPN gelding by El Dorado Vd Zeshoek x Buminka BCASSIO RIVETTI (BRA), Neil Jones Equestrian Inc: 0/0/43.154 AMEX Z: 2009 Zangersheide Mare by Andiamo Z x LandarisTODD MINIKUS (USA), Bit By Bit Group: 0/4/38.385 FINE LADY 5: 2003 Hannoverian mare by Forsyth x Drosselklang IIERIC LAMAZE (CAN), Artisan Farms LLC and Torrey Pines: 0/4/38.696 QUIBELLE: 2009 Hannoverian mare by Frh Quaid x SherrySPENCER SMITH (USA), Gotham Enterprizes, LLC: 0/4/41.057 UNE DE L’OTHAIN: 2008 Selle Français by Conterno Grande x CentoHARRIE SMOLDERS (NED), Evergate Stables, LLC: 0/4/42.028 CALLE 67: 2009 Westphalian gelding by Carell x Cleo N.w.RODRIGO PESSOA (BRA), Artemis Equestrian Farm, LLC: 0/4/44.949 UPSILON DE LA LINIERE: 2008 Selle Français gelding by Tinka’s Boy x Querlybbet HeroTAYLOR ST. JACQUES (USA), Taylor St. Jacques: 0/8/38.9510 NORTHERN LIGHT: 2011 SWB mare by Plot Blue x ContenderTIFFANY FOSTER (CAN), Artisan Farms, LLC and Tiffany Foster: 0/8/41.90 Tags: Eric Lamaze, Palm Beach International Equestrian Center, Fine Lady 5, Lillie Keenan, Agana Van Het Gerendal Z, WEF Challenge Cup Round 1, Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! More from News:MARS Bromont CCI Announces Requirements For US-Based RidersThe first set of requirements to allow American athletes and support teams to enter Canada for the June 2-6 competition have been released.Canadian Eventer Jessica Phoenix Reaches the 100 CCI4*-S MarkPhoenix achieved the milestone while riding Pavarotti at the inaugural 2021 CCI4*-S at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event.Tribunal Satisfied That Kocher Made Prolonged Use of Electric SpursAs well as horse abuse, the US rider is found to have brought the sport into disrepute and committed criminal acts under Swiss law.Washington International Horse Show Returns to TryonTIEC will again provide the venue for the WIHS Oct. 26-31 with a full schedule of hunter, jumper and equitation classes. Horse Sport Enews We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. 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JUST IN: The Tri-State Alliance Board Of Directors Announced That Finances Are In Order

first_imgThe Tri-State Alliance Board of Directors held a press conference this afternoon to address recent articles in the media.The Tri-State Alliance Board Of Directors announced that they reviewed all finances from Jan. 1, 2016 to present and have found everything in order. All monies spent have been used for the mission of the group. An independent audit will be done on the books as well.The group made a paperwork error with the IRS and has refiled the paperwork and appealed the suspension of their tax status with the IRS.The group will continue to focus on serving LGBTQ youth, educate the public and helping those living with HIV / AIDS.Questions were asked of how the board functions. The Board President, the board Vice Presidents or the secretary all have the power to call a board meeting at any time. All board members have made financial contributions to the group and served as a volunteer for the group for at least a year.For more information about the group visit TSAGL.org or visit the Tri-State Alliance on Facebook. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Working the night shift

first_img Miles to go Hilarie Cranmer gazes beyond her computer screen where she sits beneath one of the many tents erected. Cranmer, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, is a Harvard Humanitarian Initiative-affiliated faculty member who said the “focus has moved from amputating limbs to saving them.” Tent town Tents line a stretch of grass in Fond Parisien, where the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative has set up a rehabilitation hospital led by Michael VanRooyen of the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. More medical volunteers are still needed. 24-hour care Devastation An aerial view shows the town of Fond Parisien lost amid debris and crushed buildings after the 7.0 earthquake. Night shift Night falls as Aarabi (right) and Smithers make rounds at Port-au-Prince’s main hospital. Hands on Aarabi (left) and Jason Smithers (right), from Children’s Hospital Boston, consult each other while working on a patient. A moment to think Shahram Aarabi, a graduate student at the Harvard School of Public Health, peers from a bus window in reflection. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer The patient groaned as Shahram Aarabi pressed firmly but gently on his stomach, applying a clean dressing over the incision through which the Harvard School of Public Health student and surgical resident at the University of Washington had removed a burst appendix the night before.Aarabi and Jason Smithers, a pediatric surgeon at Harvard-affiliated Children’s Hospital Boston and an instructor in surgery at Harvard Medical School, worked as a team on the man, one of three patients they had operated on the night before. Darkness had fallen, and the two were among volunteer medical personnel staffing the night shift at Port-au-Prince’s largest hospital, providing badly needed care for residents of Haiti’s earthquake-devastated capital and filling a personnel hole as Haitian hospital staff returned to day-shift jobs.Smithers and Aarabi are among the many Harvard-affiliated personnel — doctors, nurses, and medical technicians — who have responded to the titanic medical emergency created by the Jan. 12 earthquake that devastated the island nation.During a week in mid-February, Aarabi and Smithers made their rounds under the auspices of Partners In Health, a nonprofit with close ties to Harvard Medical School (HMS), the Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, while nurses from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center worked alongside physician Jennifer Scott, a specialist in humanitarian response, on outreach operations at a field hospital led by the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative at Fond Parisien, an hour’s drive away.Tom Monaghan, a medical equipment technician from Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital, worked in Port-au-Prince to set up newly arrived equipment and to repair broken machines, while Natasha Archer, a Brigham resident whose family immigrated to the United States from Haiti decades ago, coordinated volunteers for Partners In Health in Port-au-Prince, using vacation time to extend her stay.Working next to the Harvard-affiliated volunteers are skilled medical personnel from an array of institutions across the country. Volunteers from the University of Chicago Medical Center, Northwestern University, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and the University of Miami work alongside a retired orthopedic surgeon who is lending a hand, along with independent physical therapists who are getting patients up and walking again, and a former Peace Corps volunteer helping with logistics at Fond Parisien.The initial tidal wave of the injured has eased, after washing over Port-au-Prince’s University Hospital and out to places like HHI’s Fond Parisien field hospital, which specializes in rehabilitation after initial treatment. But the need for medical volunteers remains acute. Hilarie Cranmer, an assistant professor at HMS and HSPH and an HHI-affiliated faculty member who is directing the Fond Parisien field hospital, said the focus has moved from amputating limbs to saving them.With a devastated infrastructure and the personal toll the earthquake took on Haitian medical staff, skilled volunteers still are needed to meet medical needs of survivors living in and around Port-au-Prince as they begin to rebuild their lives.Partners In Health, founded decades ago as a health organization with operations largely in Haiti, has brought to Haiti roughly 300 medical personnel — many from Harvard — to augment their nearly 4,000 Haiti-based staffers.“I’m pretty proud of Harvard’s response,” said Paul Farmer, the Maude and Lillian Presley Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine who co-founded Partners In Health and who, among the many hats he wears, is also the United Nations deputy special envoy to Haiti.Though the volunteers’ stays are temporary, their experience teaches enduring lessons and carves indelible marks on them. Dima Awad, a clinical pharmacist at the University of Chicago Medical Center who arrived to help at Fond Parisien, was met with a room full of donated drugs and medical supplies, some years out of date, and tasked with creating a pharmacy. She thought the job impossible, but set to it with the help of local carpenters who created shelves in what had been an orphanage classroom. Nine days later, Awad was low on sleep, but reflecting on success.“When I got here, I thought this was an impossible job,” Awad said. “After working on it, I can tell you nothing is impossible, it’s all a matter of will.”Anthony Croese, a paramedic from New York Presbyterian Hospital, spent a week at Fond Parisien traveling with colleagues to satellite sites to deliver care, identify patients who needed to be brought to the hospital, and provide vaccinations. He said they saw a lot of infections, respiratory problems, abdominal problems, and fevers.“This is definitely going to leave its mark. I don’t think I can ignore something like this again.” Croese said. “I’ll be back, whether I have to take vacation time or use my own money…. This is way beyond what you see in the news.”last_img read more

Change Calls for Courage – and the Right Technology

first_imgRyan Kaji is YouTube’s top earner – last year he made $26 million on his channel Ryan’s World, and topped Forbes’ list for the platform for 2019. And he’s eight years old.Welcome to the new digital economy. One of the hallmarks of this entity is change – which, in theory, is nothing new. While change has always been an aspect of the economy, markets in the past were more benevolent to companies who hadn’t gotten on top of making the necessary adjustments. Those days are long gone – markets have become relentless, and if you don’t make the right decisions quickly enough, then you’ve already lost.The reason for this – which I pointed to in my previous post – is that markets have never before undergone change so quickly. Development cycles are growing ever shorter. This doesn’t just apply to purely digital products like smartphones – the automotive industry has become subject to more rapid drives for change as a symbol for the analog world, for example, when it comes to steel or tin chassis, the limitations of mechanical inertia, and miserable efficiency rates. It’s simply not enough to merely exchange tin for aluminum or carbon, use flashy digital valves, or gradually improve the efficiency rate (or said more directly: consumption). This upheaval is much more profound, and the effects are more far-reaching. They relate to vehicle-related core concepts like the drive, but also entire transport infrastructures, political desires for change, societal adaptations to behavior, and competing mobility concepts. An industry that has slowly developed over the course of a century has to reinvent itself within just a few years, become more agile, and ultimately become part of an alien digital economy with totally new rules – in order words, it has to pull off a major feat.Of course, all sectors have been affected by digital change, not just the automotive industry. Aside from creating new products or business models and needing to cover the requirements of current as well as future markets, companies take on immense risks whenever they make a radical change. High investments in reconstruction, paired with questionable market success, can lead to falling revenue or crumbling stock prices.It’s not just external factors that have since made rapid change difficult. Psychological aspects also play an important role – if not the most important. Many managers (but really, all of us) are susceptible to unconscious bias and engage in subconscious, deeply engrained behavioral patterns that make us resistant to change. For example, they continue to hire new employees who fit the company culture and thus continue to tread the same path they always have. Instead, new perspectives are needed to address new markets. This also calls for fresh thinking, but this is only possible if what’s come before is called into question, and not just reaffirmed. This type of innovation is only unleashed if diversity becomes a mainstay.Of course, adapted strategies and a greater awareness of diversity within a company go hand in hand with a change in the underlying organization. This concerns structures, as well as collaboration with small organizational units. Change management processes are not just necessary for IT – it’s the only way that a radical digital transformation can truly become a reality.We at Dell Technologies posit that “We must make progress real.” We believe that IT and technology serve as motors for change, and thus also for societal progress. But if we don’t have the courage to challenge ourselves, then even the most sensational use of technology will all be for naught. We all see the need for change, but don’t want to rock the boat or shake up the status quo. And this is something that we need to overcome.last_img read more

‘One is too many’

first_imgMICHAEL YU I The Observer Student body vice president Nancy Joyce, president Alex Coccia, and Campus Minister Fr. Pete McCormick gather at the Grotto to pray for those involved with a sexual assault accusation on campus.After a sexual assault occurs on campus, students receive an emailed crime alert from Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), which is usually the first and last bit of information they hear about the incident. But behind that email notification, a response team rallies to coordinate resources all across campus for the students involved, Associate Vice President for Campus Safety Mike Seamon said.Seamon said one reported sexual assault is too many, but the University’s response proceeds from “very close collaboration” among the relevant groups.“If NDSP receives a report of a sexual assault, they’ll begin their investigation immediately and we have the resources to do that,” he said. “We would contact Student Affairs within hours of receiving that to bring them into the loop so they can make the resources available to all parties involved in that incident.“So you’ll see that you’ll have a law enforcement and a Title IX or Student Affairs response being made available together almost instantaneously.”Phil Johnson, chief of police for NDSP, said the goal of the email notifications is to release as much information allowed as quickly as they can, to get the word out to people.“We certainly want to identify where the location is when we can, when we think it’s appropriate, but there are a number of factors that are going to come into play as we write a crime alert,” Johnson said. “We try to understand where we are in the investigation and what we can release at a given time. We still want the warning out there right away.”Bill Stackman, associate vice president for student services and deputy Title IX coordinator, said although the Office of Student Affairs is obligated to investigate a sexual assault report and manage the case, the student involved can decide whether to also report the case criminally.“As soon as we hear about a case, we meet with [the student] and we assign a resource coordinator to them,” Stackmansaid. “They have the option to report criminally, or do both at the same time … or they can ask us to defer our process.”Stackman said the administration’s investigation process is “fact-finding” in nature, and because they are equally concerned with the complainant and the respondent, they provide resource coordinators to both parties for support.“[If] we have a report, we are obligated by the federal government to investigate it, to gather information and then to move it forward, and that’s what we do,” he said. “But we make sure that in everything we do that we’re taking care of both individuals equally, and that one doesn’t feel that they are automatically seen as guilty.“We’re sensitive to that perception so we try to really counter that as much as possible.”Just because a case was reported does not mean it will be on the record of the students involved, Stackman said.Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president for student affairs, said only “in very rare cases” a conduct result would become part of a student’s personal record, and only when a student is found responsible.“The support doesn’t cease with the end of the case,” Harding said. “There are many cases where the resource coordinators check in and offer support to the both of the students involved, even coming out of the process.“The care of the University community is something we see as a very continuous process any time a student has gone through a difficult time, whatever the outcome.”Stackman said a typical investigation of a sexual assault case could last around two to three weeks or longer, depending on the complexity of the case and the number of people involved in it. In order for the administration to investigate a case under Title IX, though, Stackman said both parties have to be students at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s or Holy Cross.“Let’s say a woman comes forward with a report of [being] assaulted by someone who was visiting campus. What we would do is provide her with all the support that we would just like if the respondent was a Notre Dame student; it would be identical,” he said. “I’d assign a resource coordinator to that person and let them know about their options outside of the University because there wouldn’t be any options here because the respondent is not a student. We would not have an administrative dealing, but there could be criminal options that she would have that we’d want her to be aware of.”Harding said the Office of Student Affairs makes a point of partnering with both the student body and the broader community in preventing sexual assault.“We want this to be a campus free of sexual harassment, misconduct or assault,” Harding said. “Everyone wants the same goal, and we consider the student body, the administrators, faculty and security our partners in this effort to do everything first and foremost that we can do to prevent these instances from happening at all.“If and when they do occur, I feel great about the support and the resources that we provide to investigate thoroughly and sensitively anything that occurs and to care for both students involved in the process.”Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center, said the recent changes in freshman orientation and the move from the Office of Residential Life to the Office of Community Standards marks “a shifted focus of conversation” toward a more community-driven approach. The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention has launched a big effort to train bystanders to react to sexual assault situations, she said.“I’ve heard students say there are some basic bystander obstacles for why people don’t intervene,” she said. “Í don’t know what to do’… ‘I’m afraid this isn’t my business’… ‘Am I the person to do this?’“Well, building community at Notre Dame says this is your business; this is about us taking care of each other. [The training] is happening at a level where students can really be empowered to create the kind of community that we all believe and we all envision together.”Caron Gebhardt said students should not be discouraged to report or intervene because there may be other rule violations involved, such as alcohol use or parietals.“I believe we have within Du Lac an understanding that because sexual assault is one of the most egregious things that we have, it becomes our highest priority and the other situations become issues that are secondary,” she said. “Any witness coming forward that may be involved in any other policy violation, that would be taken into consideration in the conduct process. So we really want people to step forward, knowing that.”Harding said she has seen “terrific examples” of concerned students coming forward to report assaults either as victims or bystanders.“Our first and primary hope is that these instances will not occur, but when and if they do, we want our students to know that there are resources available for them to go through this process and to be surrounded by others within the community,” she said.Contact Ann Marie Jakubowski at [email protected]: sexual assaultlast_img read more